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Volume :17 Issue : 66 1992      Add To Cart                                                                    Download

YEMEN’S ATTITUDE TOWARDS THE IRAQI OCCUPATION OF KUWAIT

Auther : Dr. Fetooh Al-Khatrash

 

         This study represents a comprehensive plan for shedding light on facts outlining the motives behind the Iraqi aggression and the stance adopted by Yemeni rulers to this effect.  Yemeni-Kuwaiti relations were deeply rooted in history prior to the oil era.  They started with trade across Arabia and continued thereafter to include aid extended to the Yemeni revolution in the South and financial support to enhance development and prosperity in both Yemens.  Kuwait also played the role of a mediator in two wars between the North and South in 1972 and 1979 consequently and contributed actively to the efforts made to bring about Yemeni unity.  The Yemeni antagonistic stance eliminated from the influence which the Iraqi Baath Party has in Yemen and which dates back to 1972, the exploitation by Iraq of Yemeni claims for territorial expansion at the expense of its neighbors, and the despotic nature of the Yemeni regime which seized power through a series of conspiracies and assignations executed with Iraq’s help.

         The Iraqi aggression represented the first difficult test for the nascent Yemeni State, which swallowed the Iraqi Bait of territorial claims, which concurred, with Yemeni dreams of expansion.  Yemen’s ruler and his clique had on several occasions called for Iraq’s withdrawal from Kuwait but at the same time called for the halt of foreign interference and the adoption of an Arab solution thus placing the aggressor on equal tooting with the victim.  The official Yemeni stance pronounced over Sanaa Radio has always been pro-Iraq coated with the false semantics of disapproving occupation.  Yemen stood firmly behind Iraq in Arab, Islamic and international forums which tool up the Gulf Crisis, including the extraordinary Arab Summit of 10th August 1990, the Arab Foreign Ministers’ Conference of 30th August 1990, the Islamic Foreign Ministers’ Conference and the consecutive meetings held by the U.N. Security Council on the crisis.

         The two ruling parties and the Presidential Council in Yemen had openly supported the Iraqi so-called initiative of 12th August 1990, but at the outset of the Iraqi aggression on Kuwait, Yemen witnessed swift angry reactions by masses there.

         These reactions contradicted with the Yemeni official stance and included several demonstrations, which were spontaneous, denouncing the Iraqi aggression and demanding Iraq’s withdrawal from Kuwait.   Such an attitude was more conspicuous in the behavior of the Yemeni opposition and that of leading personalities and tribesmen in the North and South alike.  This reflected the fact that the attitude of the Yemeni regime contradicted with Yemeni interests.  It further showed that the Yemeni people were at odds with their regime. 

         Sanaa’s irrational policies plunged Yemen into tragic consequences, which incurred a heavy price on the Yemeni people, including the loss of income for same two million Yemenis working in Arab Gulf States and the forfeit of generous aid extended by these states, particularly Saudi Arabia.

 

 

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