Kuwait-University-Journal-of-Law-header
Search
Journal of Law

Previous Issues

Advance Search
Year : From To Vol
Issue Discipline:
Author

Volume :11 Issue : 41 1985      Add To Cart                                                                    Download

SOME PATTERNS OF URBAN DEVELOPMENT IN THE SULTANATE OF OMAN

Auther : By: Dr. Fatma Al Abdul Razzak

Oman has witnessed many changes in the capital area and most of the other parts of the Sultanate. Urban settlements and building constructions have boomed since 1970 after the shortage of houses before that. Such changes are due to physical features, human and economic factors, and government policy.

The Sultanate of Oman covers an area of about 30,000 Sq. Km, 10% of which is covered by mountains, 20% by sand, and the rest by wadies. The number of population has been estimated at one million, two thirds of whom live in the Batina Plain. Economic activities vary from region to region depending on natural activities: animal husbandry in the grassy plain, agriculture in the oases, fishing in the coastal areas and trade in the main cities.

The settlement areas in Oman are an expression of the economic and social activities as well as political organization. Settlements in Oman can, therefore, be classified into the following types: coastal, oasis, mountain and desert. Most of the Omani towns are located in the Batina Coast, which extends inland in a few locations. Because of the problem of rapid urbanization especially in the capital area, the government has built many apartments and low-cost housing units. There are several architectural patterns in Oman: the traditional Arabian, the Portuguese and the modern style ones.

Muscat, the capital, is a heavily-populated town, and is also the most important trade center. Like most of the other towns, it was divided into seven quarters with the Suq forming its centre and a defensive wall surrounding it. A new development plan for Muscat took place during the 1970’s. The expansion of the Capital area extended beyond its old wall, and out grew its original border to cover the cities of Matrah and Ruwi. New residential and industrial areas were established in addition to expanding the new business section. Moreover, major housing projects in Qurm, Ruwi and Qabus city have been completed.

Settlements in the interior areas also vary in nature and are closely attached to the oasis and wadies where fresh water sources are available. They are sporadic in nature as is the case in Amil, Ibrai and Nizwa.

Journal of Law
Journal of Law

You are Visitor No.

75359

Journal of Law
Journal of Law
Tell your friendsJournal of Law
Journal of Law

Last Updated

May 18, 2017

Journal of Law
Journal of Law
Journal of Law

Please enter your email Here to receive our news

Journal of Law