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Volume :9 Issue : 34 1983      Add To Cart                                                                    Download

THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT OF YEMENI EMIGRATION

Auther : By: Dr. Abbas El-Sayyed Ibrahim

          Emigration from Yemen involves a considerable percentage of the young sector of its population; a fact, which has acted adversely upon national production and indigenous labour productivity, thus leading to more imports of consumer and capital goods.  On the other hand, the remittances of Yemeni migrants to their families contribute to the rectification of the national balance of payment.  This paper attempts at discerning these positive and negative aspects and analyses their socio-economic impact.  A sample of 3201 individual members of the General Union of Yemen Emigrants was selected as representing all emigrants. The findings of the analysis and processing of the compiled information, indicated the following:

1)                The percentage of married emigrants is 83% (only 61% among domestic inhabitants) although, 81.4% of the migrants leave their families behind.

2)                The high level of males among emigrants in the functional age group, which ranges between 97 – 99%, is responsible for a national decrease in this age category.  Some 55% of all migrants fall in the age group between 20 – 30 years, which represents 15.5% of the domestic labour force.

3)                Rural provinces are the source regions of most of the migrants since the majority of them originally come from Sanaa, Taiz, Ibb and Al-Baidha.

4)                Migration from Yemen being basically one of males has left its imprint on a distorted sex structure at home with a marked preponderance of females.

As regards, the economic impact of migration from Yemen, it has been found that the cultivated area of 1.515 million hectares remained unchanged, a fact which denotes that migrant workers actually represented a surplus manpower whose absence has not affected in the least domestic production.  Available data do not portray any marked decrease in the total agricultural output despite the absence of a considerable percentage of the youthful sector of the Yemeni labour force.  This may be attributed to an increase in the work burden of the domestic work force, particularly when it is taken into account that mechanization is still in the incipient phase. 

The collected data also revealed that throughout the period from 1972 to 1980, total consumption expenditure increased by 555%, gross domestic product by 526% and national income by 552%.  This means that consumption expenditure coincided to a great extent, with the trend of the other economic variables, contrary to the views held by many that the remittances of Yemeni workers have caused a significant rise in consumption expenditure.  It may be postulated however that these remittances may have contributed to raising the level of consumption of the emigrants’ dependents, to the national level, in addition to participation in private investments, which rose during the same period to 1216%.  It is also noticeable that the monetary transfers of the emigrants did not offset the deficit in the balance of trade but triggered an inflationary pressure, which led to a general rise in price levels.

 

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May 18, 2017

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