Kuwait-University-Journal-of-Law-header
Search
Journal of Law

Previous Issues

Advance Search
Year : From To Vol
Issue Discipline:
Author

Volume :4 Issue : 13 1978      Add To Cart                                                                    Download

THE STRESS IN KUWAITI ARABIC

Auther : Daud A. Abdo

 

A.  Matar has formulated the following rules for (primary) stress in the Kuwaiti urban dialect (1):

1.  In a word containing a long syllable (2), [primary] stress falls on that syllable whether it occurs initially, medially, or terminally.  If a word contains two long syllables, the primary stress falls on the last one of the two syllables, and a weaker stress falls on the preceding one.

2.  In words containing no long syllables, i.e. containing only medium and short syllables, the [primary] stress falls on the penult.

         The previous rules fail to account for the location of the primary stress in four different types of words:

a)     Words where the last syllable is not long, the penult is medium and the antepenult is long, e.g. salfatkum, salmiyye, talbati etc..

b)    Words where the last syllable is not long, the penult is short, and the antepenult is long, e.g. talbitak, carfite etc.

c)     Words (containing no long syllables) where the last syllable is short or medium, and the preceding two are both short, e.g. maoalan, baladi etc.

d)    Words formed of the pattern CVCC which became CVCVC as a resume being suffixed with a pronoun starting with C e.g. gabilna, sugulkum etc.

Examples in (a) and (b) violate Matar’s first rule and those in (c) and (d) violate his second rule.

         Before proposing a new set of rules, the author calls attention to the fact that stress in Kuwaiti Bedouin dialects does not differ from that in urban ones except in a certain type of words, namely those which end in the following syllable structures: the final one is not long, the penult is short, and the antepenult is not short (not long – medium or short, not short – medium or long) e.g. gassarat, sacadik, carfitik etc.  In such cases, the stress falls on the penult in urban dialects and on the antepenult in Bedouin ones.

Journal of Law
Journal of Law

You are Visitor No.

76066

Journal of Law
Journal of Law
Tell your friendsJournal of Law
Journal of Law

Last Updated

May 18, 2017

Journal of Law
Journal of Law
Journal of Law

Please enter your email Here to receive our news

Journal of Law