Kuwait-University-Journal-of-Law-header
Search
Journal of Law

Previous Issues

Advance Search
Year : From To Vol
Issue Discipline:
Author

Volume :2 Issue : 6 1976      Add To Cart                                                                    Download

AHMAD AL-A’DWANI The Mystic Poet of Society

Auther : Dr. Mohammad Hassan Abdullah

 

         This study deals with the work of one of the greatest contemporary Kuwaiti poets, namely, Ahmad Al-A’dwani. To indicate the contribution Al-A’dwani has made, the writer presents us with a brief summary of major poets, namely: Saqr Al-Shabib, Khalid Al-Faraj and Fahad Al-A’sker. These three poets are considered a transitory stage in the development of Kuwaiti poetry, proceeding two later generations of more romantics and intellectually mature poets. Each of these three poets had his own characteristics and intellectual outlook, as well as his own shortcomings. Al-Shabib was a writer of poetry more than a true poet. He called for the freedom of the mind from the handicaps of transitions, and contributed to the rise of national spirit by dealing with the political issued which concerned the Arab World in general. Al-Faraj has the same concerns as Al-Shabib, and, similarly, his poems lacked the romantic element. But Al-Shabib was more educated than Al-Rafaj and more experienced in poetic techniques and poetic tradition. The poetry of Fahd Al-A’sker was the richest of the three in the romantic element. Al-A’sker shared the same concerns as the other two, but his diction and techniques were the nearest to those of the period. The concerns of these three poets, however, were new only to Kuwait, of the Gulf at their best. All that they stood for, both intellectually and artistically had been the concern of a previous generation. Hence comes the significance of Al-A’dwani as the first Kuwaiti poet to transcend the boundaries of Kuwaiti and Gulf region. He depended on the variables of modern art and poetic imagination, and devoted himself to the renewing of the artistic values of the age and supporting its progressive social values.

         The writer divides the literary career of Al-A’dwani into three stages. The first stage which laid down the foundation of Al-A’dwani’s poetic style extends between 1946, when he published his first poem in 1952. This stage was followed by a ten-year silence. The second stage extends between 1962, when he resumed publishing his poetry, and 1967, the year of the Arab-Israeli war. The sudden military defeat had a great emotional and intellectual effect on the poets and literati of the day. The reaction of Al-A’dwani to this event and the psychological change with him represents the beginning of the third stage in his literary career, which extends to the present.

         The writer believes that the first state represents, both intellectually and emotionally, three similar axes. The first axis is the interest the poet took in his own individuality. This interest is characterized by a romantic outlook, which is coloured by pessimism, a sense of frustration and disappointment in both life and human beings. This romanticism is evident in the titles poet chose for his poems in this stage. We may find some of his poems calling for the enjoyment of the pleasures life offers, but this enjoyment is never Epicurean, looking at pleasure as an aim in itself. Rather it is a call hiding beneath it a truly sad and frustrated spirit. The second axis is the political concerns of the poet. Here, the writer finds an imbalance between the limited size of the poet’s production and the extent of his interest in Kuwaiti and Arab affairs during this stage. This makes the writer believe that the poet-produced poems dealing with this aspect that were never published. The third axis is represented in poet’s views of the universe and the human being. These views are characterized by a contemplative, philosophical outlook, which is generally coloured by a romantic pessimism that prevails in the first state in general. But the poet in his romantic poems was involved, speaking for himself and when he speaks about Man, he means Main in a given specific society. In his contemplative poems, however, the poet was uninvolved, standing outside of experience, looking at it from afar and transcending the details to reach the comprehensive implication of universal action.

         After ten-year long silence, the second stage begins with the announcement of Kuwait’s independence. The writer believes that the major concern of the poet during this stage was his call for freedom, locally, and nationally, as well as socially. It is if the writer views the liberty of his country as the embodiment of the freedom of the citizen. During this stage, the poet decreases the tension of his romanticism and moves towards realism.

         The third stage begins with the setback in 1967, after which Arab intellectuals and men of letters began to search for its causes and search for a new starting point. During this stage the poetry of Al-A’dwani is generally characterized by a definite phenomenon, namely, the re-occurrence of the images of Arab Life which are used by the poet as a multi-implicational symbol. For instance, the palm, the desert, the camel, the ruins, the departure and the tent are all used by the poet as a means of glorification, to create a sense of dignity with aim of enhancing the Arab revolutionary spirit by basing it on its Arab origins. Yet, this doesn’t mean returning from the present into the past, but diffusing life into that past. The second characteristic of Al-A’dwami’s poetry during this stage is his mystic and philosophical outlook. Experience has a new implication for A’dwani. This experience to him no longer means being a pioneer of change and adventures, rather, it has come to mean an intellectual journey into imaginary realms. Yet, the mysticism of Al-A’dwani doesn’t mean the disappearance from, or the rejection of, social life; for, to our knowledge, he who withdraws doesn’t sympathize with the others. And he who rejects doesn’t lend a friendly hand. The contemplation of Al-A’dwani is essentially social, for we discern society everywhere in his poems, and he is always sympathizing with others even though he speaks harshly about them or departs from their dead city. When Al-A’dwani criticizes his countrymen roughly, he doesn’t do so haughtily, but he seeks to shock them to consciousness and the start of a new pure life. Thus, the third stage of the poet’s literary career bears two major features. First, a search for a deeply rooted Arab originality as the starting point of revolt and change, and secondly, an eager search for fundamental truth in a contemplative outlook which goes far beyond pain and temporary changes.

Journal of Law
Journal of Law

You are Visitor No.

75804

Journal of Law
Journal of Law
Tell your friendsJournal of Law
Journal of Law

Last Updated

May 18, 2017

Journal of Law
Journal of Law
Journal of Law

Please enter your email Here to receive our news

Journal of Law