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Volume :33 Issue : 130 2015      Add To Cart                                                                    Download

Persian Inscriptions on Religious Buildings in Khania "Khiwa" During the 12-13 A.H/ 18-19 A.D Centuries: A Study of the Form and the Content (in Arabic)

Auther : Adel Sowailim - Shibl Abeed

The purpose of this research paper is to study Persian inscriptions carved on a collection of religious buildings located in Khania Khiwa within the Khwarazm region of Central Asia. The study focuses on the period between 12 A.H/ 18 A.D century and the last quarter of 13 A.H/ 19 A.D. The inscriptions were engraved above the entrances of the buildings as well as throughout their interior areas, on both marble and ceramic flooring known as "al-Mayolka." This paper evaluates these inscriptions by applying two different approaches. The first is an examination of the form or shape of these engravings and the second involves an analytical study of their content. In regards to matters concerning form and shape: The inscriptions were carved in various languages that include Persian, Arabic, Ottoman Turkish and Ghegtaei Turkish. Most of these inscriptions were carved based on the Persian Nasta'liq script. The engravings are essentially a conglomeration of a diversity of Islamic languages and this is considered to be a special feature of inscription that distinguishes Khiwa buildings from those in other parts of Central Asia. Moreover, the Nasta'liq script was commonly used in Central Asia, especially amongst the Persian community. In fact, since the beginning of the Safavid Empire, the Persian culture became widely exposed to Nasta'liq script soon after well-practiced epigraphers in Iran and Central Asia established the rules of the script during the Timurid period. Variety is also prevalent within the content of these inscriptions. For example, a number of Quranic verses and Ahadith (Islamic sayings) are etched side by side with the names of rulers and princes who governed Khiwa during the 12-13 A.H/ 18-19 A.D centuries. The combination of these different subject matters contribute to providing a deeper understanding of the political affairs as well as the spiritual principles which Central Asia had paid much attention to during the period this study focuses on.

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Dec 08, 2019

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